H R Giger? Or Poseidon’s rejects along the shore

High tides, full moon and westerly gales have brought mounds of marine debris, flotsam and jetsam to shore. All along the strandline it looks as though Poseidon himself has thrown out the bones of his soldiers, colossal waves pushing what he has discarded into neat, long piles. Mostly seaweed of course, but amidst the tumult and cry of seabirds, kelp stems appear as long, pale bones, their footings like fragments of brain, and all jumbled and heaped together with ropes, plastic bottles, buoys and pieces of wood. If not rejects of Poseidon or the Kraken, these piles of kelp might inhabit a science fiction tale and be the last remains of some alien invasion, thrown out, defeated by the sea. Nonsense I know, but in their tangled oddness, such bizarre and implausible shapes, especially where melded with human detritus, remind me of H R Giger’s monstrous, magnificent artwork.

Tangled kelp, bleached like bones, piled high

Tangled kelp, bleached like bones, piled high

 

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About Annie O'G Worsley

I'm a mum of four, gran, writer, crofter & Professor of 'Environmental Change'. I now live on a small farm (known as a croft) by the sea in a place surrounded by the ‘Great Wilderness’ mountains of the Scottish NW Highlands. I was a full-time academic, a geographer, but I decided to go feral and follow my dream of living a smaller, simpler, wilder life. I have always loved wild places. As a child I was inspired by tales of Trader Horn (my great-great-great uncle Alfred Aloysius Smith) told to me by my mother. Trader Horn spent his life wandering, mostly in Africa. I too, love stravaiging (Gaelic for wandering) and spent time in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea as a young researcher, living with tribes there. Although I spent years researching and teaching university students about environments, processes and habitats, I am discovering much, much more exploring the wilds around me. In moving away from scientific writing, I have rediscovered my wilder self and have a much deeper, truer understanding of nature than I ever had before. My work is published by Elliott & Thompson in a series of anthologies called 'Seasons' and I am currently writing a book about this extraordinary place. I continue to write academic papers with my research colleagues but I am developing new skills including landscape photography and painting. And of course, I still love to wander.
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